1. text

    nqtteacher:

    femalescientistintraining:

    Kingsley - If I Were A Teacher!

    Ahahaha. I loved this video so hard. 

    Awfully rude but makes a good point!

  2. text
    mypartneristrans:

seanbeanisaredshirt:

harokissmile:

ksteeno:

spoookyscary:

After succumbing to a fever of some sort in 1705, Irish woman Margorie McCall was hastily buried to prevent the spread of whatever had done her in. Margorie was buried with a valuable ring, which her husband had been unable to remove due to swelling. This made her an even better target for body snatchers, who could cash in on both the corpse and the ring.
The evening after Margorie was buried, before the soil had even settled, the grave-robbers showed up and started digging. Unable to pry the ring off the finger, they decided to cut the finger off. As soon as blood was drawn, Margorie awoke from her coma, sat straight up and screamed.
The fate of the grave-robbers remains unknown. One story says the men dropped dead on the spot, while another claims they fled and never returned to their chosen profession.
Margorie climbed out of the hole and made her way back to her home.
Her husband John, a doctor, was at home with the children when he heard a knock at the door. He told the children, “If your mother were still alive, I’d swear that was her knock.”
When he opened the door to find his wife standing there, dressed in her burial clothes, blood dripping from her finger but very much alive, he dropped dead to the floor. He was buried in the plot Margorie had vacated.
Margorie went on to re-marry and have several children. When she did finally die, she was returned to Shankill Cemetery in Lurgan, Ireland, where her gravestone still stands. It bears the inscription “Lived Once, Buried Twice.”

what did i just read

Irish women are strong as fuck

I’m Irish and I can conclude that we are motherfucking metal


Women in general are metal as fuck.

    mypartneristrans:

    seanbeanisaredshirt:

    harokissmile:

    ksteeno:

    spoookyscary:

    After succumbing to a fever of some sort in 1705, Irish woman Margorie McCall was hastily buried to prevent the spread of whatever had done her in. Margorie was buried with a valuable ring, which her husband had been unable to remove due to swelling. This made her an even better target for body snatchers, who could cash in on both the corpse and the ring.

    The evening after Margorie was buried, before the soil had even settled, the grave-robbers showed up and started digging. Unable to pry the ring off the finger, they decided to cut the finger off. As soon as blood was drawn, Margorie awoke from her coma, sat straight up and screamed.

    The fate of the grave-robbers remains unknown. One story says the men dropped dead on the spot, while another claims they fled and never returned to their chosen profession.

    Margorie climbed out of the hole and made her way back to her home.

    Her husband John, a doctor, was at home with the children when he heard a knock at the door. He told the children, “If your mother were still alive, I’d swear that was her knock.”

    When he opened the door to find his wife standing there, dressed in her burial clothes, blood dripping from her finger but very much alive, he dropped dead to the floor. He was buried in the plot Margorie had vacated.

    Margorie went on to re-marry and have several children. When she did finally die, she was returned to Shankill Cemetery in Lurgan, Ireland, where her gravestone still stands. It bears the inscription “Lived Once, Buried Twice.”

    what did i just read

    Irish women are strong as fuck

    I’m Irish and I can conclude that we are motherfucking metal

    Women in general are metal as fuck.

    (via missdunlop)

  3. housewifeswag:

    what-a-hoth:

    This was my first splatter paint project that I did for my girlfriend before she left the states. It was a lot of fun and I can’t wait until she’s back so we can do more.

    I wanna do this!

    (via little-miss-student-teacher)

  4. seekhappynights:

    this is the best line i’ve ever read

    (Source: swearslikecapaldi, via little-miss-student-teacher)

  5. text
  6. edukaition:

    I say this in real life situations perhaps far more than it is needed.

    (Source: visualpantheon, via itakeupspace)

  7. text
    theysayimpsychodiaries:

fat-grrrl-activism:

“In 1921, early suffragettes often donned a bathing suit and ate pizza in large groups to annoy men…it was a custom at the time”
(via Cult of Aphrodite Vintaga)

who votes we do this
i would love to eat pizza and annoy men

    theysayimpsychodiaries:

    fat-grrrl-activism:

    “In 1921, early suffragettes often donned a bathing suit and ate pizza in large groups to annoy men…it was a custom at the time”

    (via Cult of Aphrodite Vintaga)

    who votes we do this

    i would love to eat pizza and annoy men

    (via applesandibexes)

  8. text

    Ranking Words

    connieanony:

    There was a free download from TpT this morning that goes along with this — I LOVE this activity and can think of so many uses for it in different content areas or just with new vocabulary.  I’m thinking I could use it for sequencing events… so many possibilities.

    What ideas can you think of?

  9. text
  10. text
    missdunlop:

kittyjs:

This Wednesday, there is a National Teaching Strike organised by the NUT (the biggest union in the UK). I’ve been thinking of this for a while and I just wanted to write something about why I support the strike. Lots of people will put this much more eloquently than me, but hey ho:
I am an NQT (in my first year of teaching). I work something like 50-55 hours at school a week, plus an hour or two at home in the evenings plus at least a day’s work at the weekend. I obviously work less during the holidays but I still work during the holidays. If I don’t do work during an evening, I’m still thinking about school/the next day, and 9 times out of 10, I feel guilty for not working.
I love my job - I love working with kids, planning activities which are fun and interesting for them, seeing them learn things and grasp more difficult concepts - but I’m exhausted. Like, seriously exhausted. On Wednesday evening, I got hugely stressed out before going to bed and got massively worked up, started crying, and couldn’t stop. I ended up sleeping on the sofa so I didn’t disturb the (poorly) boy and so I could put the TV on to distract/occupy my mind. I just got hugely overwhelmed and because I was so tired it was just too much.
There was a report/survey released recently that stated that teachers, on average, work almost 60 hours a week (Teacher Workload Survey 2013, can be found on the DfE website). Not a single teacher I know was surprised by this or thought it was anything unusual.
Now, I don’t want to complain about how much work I do as my main point - I know there are lots of professions that do similar hours and work just as hard as teachers do - what I have a problem with is the constant criticism of teachers from the government and media. And I wouldn’t even mind that as much if there was a little bit of recognition and appreciation now and then. And when a variety of statistics say that something like 40% of teachers drop out of the career in their first 5 years - surely there’s something wrong.
There are other things I have huge issues with - the amount of testing and pressure applied to children, the stress and pressure from Ofsted.
There are so many aspects of my job I utterly love - I love it when kids grasp a difficult concept, when my more difficult kids work hard and really achieve something, when kids try hard and enjoy what they’re doing and when they’re proud of themselves - I love all of that. I love helping a kid see and achieve their potential. I love breaking down the barriers which are stopping a child from learning. But I don’t love the constant pressure, constant work and constant exhaustion.  And that’s got to change.

Said so perfectly! My union isn’t striking but I fully support anyone that is striking - teaching is so much harder than anyone gives teachers credit for and the constant attack on all fronts is too much to bear. Something HAS to change and change soon - as a fellow NQT I’m almost at burnout stage and I feel so guilty when I actually spend time with my fiance in the evening instead of doing anything on my to do list (which averages 20 bullet points at any one time…)

    missdunlop:

    kittyjs:

    This Wednesday, there is a National Teaching Strike organised by the NUT (the biggest union in the UK). I’ve been thinking of this for a while and I just wanted to write something about why I support the strike. Lots of people will put this much more eloquently than me, but hey ho:

    I am an NQT (in my first year of teaching). I work something like 50-55 hours at school a week, plus an hour or two at home in the evenings plus at least a day’s work at the weekend. I obviously work less during the holidays but I still work during the holidays. If I don’t do work during an evening, I’m still thinking about school/the next day, and 9 times out of 10, I feel guilty for not working.

    I love my job - I love working with kids, planning activities which are fun and interesting for them, seeing them learn things and grasp more difficult concepts - but I’m exhausted. Like, seriously exhausted. On Wednesday evening, I got hugely stressed out before going to bed and got massively worked up, started crying, and couldn’t stop. I ended up sleeping on the sofa so I didn’t disturb the (poorly) boy and so I could put the TV on to distract/occupy my mind. I just got hugely overwhelmed and because I was so tired it was just too much.

    There was a report/survey released recently that stated that teachers, on average, work almost 60 hours a week (Teacher Workload Survey 2013, can be found on the DfE website). Not a single teacher I know was surprised by this or thought it was anything unusual.

    Now, I don’t want to complain about how much work I do as my main point - I know there are lots of professions that do similar hours and work just as hard as teachers do - what I have a problem with is the constant criticism of teachers from the government and media. And I wouldn’t even mind that as much if there was a little bit of recognition and appreciation now and then. And when a variety of statistics say that something like 40% of teachers drop out of the career in their first 5 years - surely there’s something wrong.

    There are other things I have huge issues with - the amount of testing and pressure applied to children, the stress and pressure from Ofsted.

    There are so many aspects of my job I utterly love - I love it when kids grasp a difficult concept, when my more difficult kids work hard and really achieve something, when kids try hard and enjoy what they’re doing and when they’re proud of themselves - I love all of that. I love helping a kid see and achieve their potential. I love breaking down the barriers which are stopping a child from learning. But I don’t love the constant pressure, constant work and constant exhaustion.  And that’s got to change.

    Said so perfectly! My union isn’t striking but I fully support anyone that is striking - teaching is so much harder than anyone gives teachers credit for and the constant attack on all fronts is too much to bear. Something HAS to change and change soon - as a fellow NQT I’m almost at burnout stage and I feel so guilty when I actually spend time with my fiance in the evening instead of doing anything on my to do list (which averages 20 bullet points at any one time…)

→

About

Yes, I'm THAT penguin the Beatles sang about.
Also an experienced primary school teacher blogging about 'teachy' type stuff.

Search

People I follow